In-depth week #5

1. What went particularly well during your mentoring sessions?

My mentor, Señora Galliford is really good at understanding the questions which I ask, and knowing exactly where I want to go with them, which is unique from last year. With my last in-depth, a lot more clarifying questions had to be asked, as Slam poetry is more subjective than Spanish. This year our meetings are super efficient, while still informative and enjoyable.

What learning challenges emerged?

a. What did you do to hold yourselves accountable for the learning?

As it goes with new relationships, there is always a period of time designated for adjusting to each other, and getting used to seeing the other person on a regular basis. I wouldn’t say that my mentor and I have experienced any “learning challenges” but more just understanding how the other person works, and trying to alter our own perceptions of the world to fit that. I am very planned and organized, but my mentor likes spontaneity and spur of the moment ideas. As a teacher, Señora Galliford wants to teach me the lessons based on every question I ask, but I’m assuming that as this project progresses more, I will take the reign, and probably just ask for resources and occasional questions. Already I am holding myself accountable in this manner, by going through everything I learn at the meetings, by myself. I come to the next meeting with extension questions to the previous meeting, as well as lists of resources which I have found useful in my continued learning.

4. What logical challenges affected your communication?

  1. What factors affected your ability to interact effectively?

Since Señora Galliford hasn’t spoken Spanish at a higher level, for a number of years, she is worried that she won’t be able to answer a lot of my questions. Because I haven’t gotten to an advanced level yet, she has understood all of my questions, or just needed a quick refresher. However, I will probably be learning higher level concepts which she isn’t super confident with, by the end of the year. Señora Galliford, however is looking forward to the challenge, as she wants to be fluent again, she just hasn’t taught grade eleven and twelve Spanish courses in a long time. I think that learning alongside my mentor is important, so that it is less of a teacher-student relationship. Combined, we both have a lot of external resources who we can look to if need be.

Status Report:

I have been meeting with my mentor every week now, as it is convenient to meet, and I feel that I am gaining a lot from the meetings. By the end of this weekend, I will have finished unit two on Rosetta Stone, on top of some work on Duolingo, and studyspanish.com. I also completed my first Spanish research session this week. I wanted to learn more about the effect that certain Latinos have had on modern culture and media. I did some research on actress, Gina Rodriguez, and learnt a TON. During this weeks meeting, my main question was clarifying the difference between the Spanish words tú, tus, su and sus which as you may have guessed have very similar meanings. The spark notes, is that they all translate to “your” in English, but are used in different contexts, depending on how many items a person has.

Statuse Reporte en Español:

Yo miro mi mentor todo la semana ahora, es facíl y yo feel que yo mucho entonces. La fin de semana, mi “Rosetta Stone” units son finito. Yo estoy estudiando “Duolingo” y “estudiar español . com”. Yo finito mi primera español research projet está semana tambien. Yo quiero entonce mas about Latinos effect que tele y computadora de hoy society. Yo did research que la actriz Gina Rodriguez y entones mas. Está semana, mi primera question es “que es la difference entre words de español, tú, tus, su, y sus?” La mismo en ingles. They mean “your” pero are usar en diferente contexts depending on cuantos itemes un persona tiene.

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